2017 Graduate Ceremony (5 p.m.)


Commencement processional will start
soon. The audience may remain seated for the student processional and stand as able for the entry of the platform party and colors. At the conclusion of the ceremony, those in attendance are asked to please be respectful and stay seated until all students have been recognized as graduates and the platform party has recessed from the stage. Thank you for your cooperation. Ladies and gentlemen, introducing the
2017 graduating class from South Dakota State University. Founded in 1881 as the
state’s Morrill Act land-grant institution, South Dakota State
University improves quality of life through exemplary teaching, relevant
research, and connected outreach. Today’s graduates represent a broad range of academic disciplines, some traced to the university’s earliest days and others developed in response to the needs of the state and region. Under the leadership of Provost Dennis
Hedge, faculty are led by marshals. Professor Huitian Lu and Associate Professor Thomas Stenvig. PhD candidates are accompanied by their advisors. Ladies and gentlemen, please stand. Under the leadership of President Barry H. Dunn, the platform party is led by honorary marshals, Professor Patty Hacker and Distinguished Professor Carter Johnson. The mace, carried by Dr. Johnson, signifies the authority and pageantry of academic ceremonies. Honorary marshals lead the processional in recognition of distinguished service to the university. Information about today’s speakers and honorary marshals is printed in the program. For 26 years, Patty Hacker has held a research, teaching, and service position as a Professor of Physical Education of Teacher Education at South Dakota State University. For 25 of those years, she served as coordinator of the program, leading efforts that resulted in the first national program recognition
and accreditation. Dr. Hacker most recently received her state associations
Honor Award in 2016 and in March 2017 was presented with a society of health
and physical educators America Honor Award, one of the National Association’s highest honors. She was Shape Central District Scholar 2011. She currently serves as a council for the Accreditor of Education Preparation Site Visitor, a position she has held since 2006. As a member of the Graduate Faculty of the department, she taught graduates courses in the Sport Pedagogy program. And
finally, for 14 years she taught the Physical Education program to the SDSU
kindergarten class. dr. W Carter Johnson Dr. W. Carter Johnson is the Distinguished Professor of Ecology at South Dakota State University. He received his Bachelor of Science
degree from Augustana College in 1968 and his PhD in Botany from North Dakota
State University in 1971. He has held positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tennessee and Virginia Tech. Dr. Johnson has published over 125
peer-reviewed research papers and book chapters during his career on the subject of plant ecology, the relationship between plants and the environment. He has received professional awards for his research on ecological effects on the dams of the Missouri and Platte rivers, The National
Research Council appointed him to four expert panels. In addition to his academic career, Dr. Johnson is actively consulted for the government and
industry to solve practical problems involving environmental and ecological
issues. He has consulted with the Army Corps of Engineers, the US Department of
Justice, Nebraska Public Power District, Central Nebraska Power and Irrigation District, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Sheyenne River tribes, Idaho
Power Company, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Attorney General’s
Office of the State of South Dakota. President Dunn, Regent Sutton, distinguished guests, members of the faculty, administrative leadership at the
University, graduates, family and friends of graduates, and ladies and gentlemen, I
welcome you to the 2017 commencement ceremony of South Dakota State
University which will now be in order. Please remain standing for the
presentation of colors of the Army ROTC Cadets George Herricks and Eric Holdsclaw and the Army ROTC Cadets Chandler Bauer and Graham Pickner. The Eagle staff
by Marine Philip Eagle and the playing of our National Anthem by the symphonic
band. Please remain standing until the colors are posted and the anthem is
finished You may be seated. Please welcome the
President of South Dakota State, Barry H. Dunn. Good afternoon. It is my privilege to
serve as the 20th President of South Dakota State University and to welcome
you to the University’s 131st commencement. A special day of
recognition and of celebration this This afternoon’s ceremony is for students
receiving the PhD degree, Doctor of Nursing Practice degree, Doctor of
Pharmacy degree, or master’s degree. The undergraduate ceremonies were held this morning and earlier this afternoon. More than 1500 students met the
qualifications for bachelor’s and associate degrees. Thank you for coming,
we are glad you are here. Today we celebrate the completion of more than 450 graduate degrees and earlier today we awarded more than 2,000 undergraduate
degrees in the 2016-2017 academic year As you can imagine, an event like this
relies on the collaboration and efforts of a great many people so I’d like to
briefly recognize a few of them for you now. The ROTC ushers in color guard,
Associate Professor of Nursing Thomas Stenvig, and Professor of Engineering Huitian Lu who served as faculty marshals, assisting the students and faculty in the processional this afternoon and the symphonic band under the direction of Jacob Wallace, Assistant Professor of Music, and Kevin Kessler, Director of Athletic Bands. Please help me in thanking them for their contributions to very special day. I also want to thank our honorary
marshals who were introduced earlier. Dr. Carter Johnson and Dr. Patty Hacker,
will you both please step forward? Please join me in recognizing them as
well. It is now my pleasure to introduce those
members of the platform party participating in today’s ceremony who
will not be introduced later in the program. I ask them to stand and be recognized. Please hold your applause until all have been introduced. Vice President for Student Affarirs, Michaela Willis, Interim Dean of the Van D. and Barbara B. Fischbach Honors College, Rebecca Bhat, and Chief Librarian Christie Tornquist. Thank you for being part of today’s celebration. I also would like to recognize and thank
all of the parents, friends, and loved ones who are here to share this special
day with today’s graduates You have provided your support and encouragement
in countless ways over the past years. Members of the graduating class
of 2017, please rise to recognize and thank your parents, friends, and loved
ones for their support with a round of applause. Let them know how much you
appreciate them It’s my pleasure this afternoon to
introduce Dr. Suzanne Ortega who currently serves as the President of the Council of Graduate Schools who has worked at two nearby land-grant
universities during her career. In addition to working at the University of
Nebraska and the University of Missouri, Ortega has served as the Senior Vice
President for Academic Affairs for the University of North Carolina system. She
was the Executive Vice President and Provost at the University of New Mexico
Vice Provost and Graduate Dean at the University of Washington after serving
in a similar role at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She previously served
the Council of Graduate Schools as the board’s chair in 2005 and as chair of the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools in 2003. Ortega has also led the
Graduate community through a number of prestigious board and committee service
positions. Ortega, who received a bachelor’s degree from Austin Peay State
University, added a master’s degree and doctorate from Vanderbilt University. After serving as a Research Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt, She started as an Assistant Professor at the University of Nebraska, the start of a 20-year career in Lincoln. She spent the final five years as the Associate Dean of the Graduate Studies before moving to the University of Missouri. Ortega is a
widely published expert in mental health, epidemiology, health services, and race and ethnic relations Please welcome Suzanne to the podium. Thank you, thank you so much. It is a huge
pleasure for me to spend this very special day with you celebrating
accomplishments well-earned. You know, I serve, I have the privilege and honor of serving as President of the Council of Graduate School and that organization in
fact is the only national organization whose sole purpose is to advocate for
and advance access to high quality graduate programs. And from that vantage point what I can tell you, in case you didn’t already know, is you are very special. It’s fewer than one in ten individuals over the age of 25 in the U.S. who holds a master’s degree and it’s only about one in a hundred who
hold the doctorate. So while I know this you know on the ground the work it took
and the unique pathway you took to your success. Your struggles and your joys
are what we celebrate here today but as doctor, the president said, “No one ever
earns a graduate degree alone.” Without our wonderful faculty mentors,
our success wouldn’t be possible and because we can never say thank you too
frequently, graduates, would you join me in celebrating and thanking your
graduate faculty? And then in a slight reverse, I would
like to ask the friends and family supported you through thick and thin to
rise. And now we will, one more time, give each
and every one of you all the thanks that you deserve. Thank you friends and family. Graduates, be proud of your degree. It
really is a special marker, it means a great deal to you and it certainly means
a great deal to your family and friends. To employers and others in the world
beyond your degree signals a lot of important things. It stands as a signal,
this achievement is a signal of your intelligence and your deep understanding
of the skills of your discipline. it It indicates that you know how to answer
questions but I would suggest to you even more importantly that you know how
to ask interesting and important questions. You have demonstrated your
capacity for hard work, for resilience, and for lifelong learning. But if the word “learner” seems overly repeated in what I’ve just described, what’s important also is that you have become creators of knowledge. Among the South
Dakota State University graduates this past year, these are among the things you
all have discovered. You have discovered how dual enrollment programs for high schoolers may actually be an important process in helping students persist in
college, you further the understanding of how restricting the diets of pregnant
beef cows can affect their offspring, you have prioritized and identified
priorities and conservation areas for colonies of native freshwater mussels,
you have discovered possible techniques for remediating sodic soils, and last but
not least you have identified effective practices for preparing student affairs professionals to address the needs of American Indian students. This knowledge
you have created will not only contribute to a body of scholarly work,
but all of it has important practical implications.
But you have learned processes and policies that will have real
implications for improving educational success and access for students now in
South Dakota but throughout the nation. You have discovered methods that will
help preserve our land at the same time it make it possible for farmers and
ranchers to feed not only their own families but to feed the world.
You know when we’ll use knowledge that you observe and create every day to
improve the practice of care perhaps where you are the first point of reference into a healthcare system for a person in pain and in need. You move through the world with expanded capacities that employers count on, in
fact they recognize in those capacities in terms of your career that are
recognized have salary implications on average compared to your peers with
bachelor’s only degrees, you will earn higher salaries. We know from
Purdue and Gallup polls that you will have higher life satisfaction, that you
will believe more strongly that your lives have meaning and purpose, we know
that individuals with graduate degrees have better health, volunteer more, are
more politically, engaged, and politically active. We also know that
your graduate degrees provide a kind of insulation from the uncertainties of
market forces. But I want to talk for just one moment about this notion of career, you certainly heard mine. I didn’t have one career, I had many. And the Bureau of Labor Statistics tells us that Millennials, you essentially, and those a
little older than you won’t have a single career, you will have many. The best estimates are 11 jobs and 5 different careers. If that’s the future of your work life, think about the absolute critical importance of your capacity to be flexible, to embrace new colleagues,
new ideas, and to do so in changing work settings. This will be important not only in your working lives but important to your communities. And what about community? If your degree is relevant for you and your immediate kin, what about the larger community that nurtured you? Communities nurture all of us and we
have a responsibility to bring back to and transform those communities for the
better and maybe as holders of advanced degrees, we have special responsibilities
to communities because we have the capacity for deep and sustained analysis,
for managing complex tasks, and for the ability to engage intellectually with people who don’t necessarily agree with us nor we with them. Increasingly rare I’m afraid and never, ever more important. So through your research, what else might
you do for your communities? What have you already done for your communities?
Work to understand that new responsibilities that are emerging for
registered nurses who assume caregiving roles outside of the hours they spend on
a floor in a clinic and in a hospital. You’ve developed strategies for building
better alternatives to replace aging bridge infrastructure more effective in
sustainable forms of renewable energy. How to transform, listen to this, how to
transform the experience of a cancer diagnosis into a poetic opportunity.
Through jobs and volunteer opportunities you pursued through public engagement
and private advocacy, you matter. You matter indeed. And what about community? You know the notion of community can be defined in many many ways. Perhaps most
frequently we think of our hometown, we think of the county we lived in or the
part of the state we lived in. But communities can transcend states,
they can transcend cities and towns, they can extend to the nation, and their
communities of identity. Gender communities, communities of race,
ethnicity, religion, and culture. There are communities of common interest, and what we know without a doubt is that those communities composed of many, many
different people with different points of view and perspectives are more
successful in producing workable, innovative solutions to complex problems
than those that are more homogeneous. We know that diverse learning environments benefit absolutely everyone and it is so very clear from seeing the group of
students and the proud graduates here today representing that many, many states
of the US and 90-plus nations of the world, I think I got that right,
a diverse community you have a diverse community you are and you will go back
to diverse communities and make them better. I think as we focus on our communities too, it’s important to think about this
degree that we hold, holding and signifying our own work but the work of others. And, and what it means to us as we move forward in our lives. But I want to suggest you that it also holds a symbolic value. It stands as a signal
that you participate in a community, an international community of learners,
scholars, practitioners, and teachers. Those people are the a Spurs of
questions and the Herald’s of nuance. In a world where sound bites and tweets
dominate news cycles, these social roles have never been more essential and more
important. So as you move forward, understand who you are. Your unique contributions help to strengthen your communities and our society as a whole. When I began talking about your tremendous
accomplishments, I began thinking about you collectively but I suspect that for
many of you there are other things to celebrate today and in this moment.
Perhaps you were the first person in your family to graduate from college, and
if you weren’t the first person to graduate in your college, perhaps you were the first one to complete a graduate degree. Perhaps you were the first woman from your community to study in a particular field of science or engineering. For each first you have had the distinct honor to be, I hope you will take up the responsibility to make sure you are not the last. Tonight, celebrate
tomorrow, your future, our future is in your hands. Congratulations, graduates. Thank you very much, Dr. Ortega, for those
inspirational remarks. Students, graduates, and professional
education provides opportunities for you to be stretched and to achieve your
highest potential. This potential is achieved because of guidance and
mentoring of the graduate faculty. I would now ask that the members of the
faculty and those Student Affairs staff here today to stand and be recognized.
Please join me in thanking the faculty and staff. The university takes pride in all its
graduates, but faculty and administrators take special pride in those who have
achieved high levels of academic excellence. I welcome to the podium,
Provost Hedge who will recognize those students graduating with academic honors. Earning a degree takes hard work and commitment, a special group of graduates deserve extra recognition today. These students have reached the highest levels of academic achievement. SDSU initiates students into the National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. The members are elected from every branch of the arts, sciences, humanities, and the professional colleges. Graduate students are also admitted to honor societies within their disciplines. This afternoon we want to recognize those who have achieved this high scholastic record. Will those who have been admitted to an Honor Society please stand so that you may be recognized? Now, I’m pleased to introduce Lieutenant Colonel Corey Norris, Professor of Military Science for Army ROTC. He will recognize the army candidate for Commission. Thank you, Provost Hedge. On behalf of the
United States Army, please join us in congratulating the 2017 SDSU graduate,
Second Lieutenant Chelsie Menzer who was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army at a ceremony held yesterday. Second Lieutenant Menzer, please stand to be recognized. Andi Fouberg is a 1999 graduate of
South Dakota State University and President and CEO of South Dakota State
University’s Alumni Association. Ms. Fouberg will bring greetings to the
graduates as they transition from students to alumni. Andi. Thank you, President Dunn. Good afternoon, graduates. It is an honor to be with you here today
and officially welcome you as you join nearly 88,000 individuals who have
graduated from this institution. Your hard work and achievements have led you to this day and we are very proud to have you as part of the growing alumni
family. Today, you ring the bell for the yellow and blue as you enter the next phase of your life as a jackrabbit. We at the South Dakota State University Alumni Association, are excited to welcome you to the Alumni ranks as you join a growing list of Staters who continue to lead their chosen industries and communities. Congratulations, again, to
each and every one of you on a job well done. As you walk across this stage, you
will be closing a chapter of your life. But at the same time, you’ll be opening
another. As you leave this place as a student, remember that no matter where you go, no matter what you do, you will always be a member of the South Dakota State University family. We at the Association are very proud of you and
look forward to helping you stay connected to your alma mater and hope
you will visit often. Today and forever more, you will be Jackrabbits. Congratulations, graduates, and best of luck to you all. Thank you, Andi. Dean of the Graduate School, Kinchel Doerner, will now introduce this year’s student speaker. Kinchel. An important part of our commencement
ceremony is an opportunity for a member of the graduating class to address the
gathering. I’m pleased to introduce to you Olivia Durowah as this year’s speaker. A spring 2017 graduate student with double master’s degrees in economics and data science, who will offer remarks on behalf of this year’s graduates. Born and raised in Buokrom, in a small town in Ghana-West Africa, Durowah received her Bachelor of Arts degree in economics from the University
of Cape Coast, Ghana, where she was a two-time recipient of the prestigious Dean’s Award for Excellent Academic Performance. She graduated in 2013 and
received the award for the overall best female student. Ms. Durowah came to SDSU in
the spring of 2000, in the spring of 2015. Arriving, she has participated in student
case competitions such as the International Food and Agribusiness Management Association and the Southwest Case Research Association. She, in the company of other students, won the most Outstanding Student Paper Award at the 2015 Southwest Case Research Association Conference in Oklahoma City. She is also actively engaged in student organizations such as the Economics Graduate Students Association and the Firestarter’s Campus Ministry. Her most valued college experience here hour was getting the opportunity to represent SDSU in those student competitions. Please welcome Olivia Durowah. Welcome. It’s with the greatest humility and honor that I stand here today representing the collective voice of this most amazing, talented, and inspiring class, class of 2017. As we step into the shoes of those who worked on this campus before us and
join the wider world, perhaps these words will serve as a light to guide our way.
Today we graduate with masters and PhDs. Grad school is over and finally you will
return to serve our communities and countries. And we seek to inspire others.
For others, for some, this is the end of school. For others, the journey has just
began. Whichever side you find yourself, one thing to notice life is an eternal
school and we are eternal students. It’s indeed a privilege to be here today, but
as the Good Book measures there is no such thing as impossible, only if you believe. I believed and I would like to share a part of my story. It’s one of a shared strong will and determination and hopefully it inspires you to believe too. Life for me began in the back roads, middle of nowhere town with
no electricity part of Ghana-West Africa. My childhood was not normal.
My immediate family collapsed when I was six and as the faith and only girl child
among seven siblings, life was hard. My family’s burden was left to my
paternal grandma, who had limited financial means. She who had no education repeated to me the immortal words of Dr. Kwegyir-Aggrey, a woman’s right activist and I quote, “If you educate a man you educate one person, but if you educate a woman you educate the entire nation.” Amidst our tight financial circumstances, my grandma took my siblings and I through school. And she devised a means she termed rotational education, and in the scheme, my siblings and I took tend to attend school. And so when it was my turn
to go to high school, my younger siblings would have to wait and when it was another stand I would have to take a year off from school. The system worked pretty well until the passing of my grandma just when I was about to enter high school. As a young woman, I suddenly felt the weight of the world on my shoulders, but with time I discovered that I had a strong will and more
discipline than I suspected. I always wanted to pursue higher education. Not only did I know that was my only ticket out of poverty, I also knew that it will help me to make an impact on my community and beyond. In high school, I eagerly guarded up every opportunity that came my way. Making the good grades in my first year of school and in the end I end an excellence award, which took care of my entire high school education and related expenses. I then proceeded to the University of Cape Coast to pursue a degree in economics and I graduated top of my class in 2013. I was admitted to the economics program
here at SDSU in the spring of 2015 and that’s a perfect time for an African to
learn about South Dakota winters. With a strong will, passion, and desire to
succeed, I worked hard today to stand here with
two masters degrees. One in economics and the other in data science. My grandma
must be proud of me in heaven. I say to you today that the knowledge that you have you make stronger and wiser from setbacks means that you are ever after
secured in your abilities to believe and survive. You will never truly know
yourself nor the strength of your relationships and to both have been
tested by adversities. Dr. Luther King Junior once said, “If you have nothing to die for, then you have nothing to live for.” I live for my grandma, my siblings, my entire village, and most importantly all of humanity. We have a responsibility to
our communities and to our world. Regardless of our majors and
aspirations, a responsibility to improve the lives of others, to uphold the values
of brotherliness, and to aspire to make this world better than we found it.
One day at a time and one neighbor at a time. SDSU has been generous to us,
particularly to international students. The warm reception we received in these
past few years has been overwhelming. The diversity here at SDSU makes us as
students thrive and broadens our understanding of how the world works.
Class of 2017 more than being taught what to think, we have been taught how to
think, how to question, and most importantly why it is imperative to do both. I encourage all of us to continue to
seek purpose by contributing to society for it is only in doing so that we can
discover how best to use our college experience and give back to society.
Therein lies the true bounty of education. Today’s achievement may fade
or even be forgotten, the applause may become a distant memory, our certificates
and medals may gather dust on a shelf or in a drawer, but you will always be
remembered for caring enough, for helping someone, for making someone feel special and appreciated, and for being the kind of person that others enjoy being with. Your
life is a remarkable occasion and I have no doubts that you will rise to it. Class
of 2017, congratulations. Thank you. Thank you, Olivia, for those inspirational
remarks. I am pleased to invite the honorable Bob Sutton, President of the South Dakota Board of Regents to the podium to
authorize the conferral of degrees. Regent Sutton. Thank you, Mr. President.
Thank you for the opportunity to be here this afternoon. Commencement day is a time of new beginnings and celebration. It is truly an honor for me to be
spending my day at South Dakota’s largest university celebrating a tremendous accomplishment with students, family members, and faculty. A special congratulations to Barry Dunn on his first commencement as president of South Dakota State. As a first-generation college graduate in my family, the opportunities afforded to me as a student at a public institution of higher learning cannot be understated. As I have said on many occasions, there are very few of my classmates from the class of 1990, at that university in Vermillion
that cannot be spoken in this building, that would have ever imagined that I
would be standing in front of you as a member of the South Dakota Board of
Regents. Education provided that opportunity it also does not seem
possible that 27 years ago, 27 years has passed, since I was conferred my first
degree. If you, graduate students, think grad school finals were difficult, take a look at what 27 years in the real world will do to you. When I graduated I looked
like Channing Tatum, now this is what you get. When you leave here today, to
continue your education or to continue or begin your careers, you will no doubt
be approached by countless people who want to know more about you. When asked
to say something about ourselves, we too often let people know what we do for a living. In many cultures the response is different and better. They tell people, I’m a husband or a father, or a wife or a mother, or a daughter or a son, or a brother or a sister. After today, I submit to you that when you are asked let anyone who will listen to you know that you are a proud graduate of South
Dakota State University. That is something that no one will ever take from you. Congratulations to all in attendance today. To the graduates and their families, this is a day to celebrate the culmination of planning,
preparing, saving, spending, and executing. On behalf of the South Dakota Board of Regents, we wish you only the very best professionally and personally. To the administration, the faculty, and all support personnel at south Dakota State, This is another proud day as you send forth into the world a group of fine, educated students to improve their lives, and more importantly, to improve the lives of others. Thanks to each and every one of you for your commitment to that. So, by the authority vested in me by the South Dakota Board of Regents, I hereby grant President Barry Dunn authority to confer the degrees for the spring commencement of 2017. All the best to each of you. Thank you. Thank you, Regent Sutton. The candidates
for the Doctor of Philosophy degrees will be presented by the President of
the Faculty Senate professor, Meredith Redlin. Will the candidates please stand? The highest earned academic degree is that of Doctor of Philosophy. Generally five years beyond the bachelor’s degree is necessary to complete the PhD
requirements. Formal coursework and seminars are part of this degree and
in addition the successful candidates extend the limits of knowledge of
society by presenting the results of original research that has stood the
test of their faculty mentors. President Dunn, we have 54 candidates in
attendance who have accomplish this and have satisfied the Graduate Faculty they are
worthy recipients of this degree. The titles of their research are printed in
the program. I take pleasure in presenting these individuals so that you
may confer upon them the degree Doctor of Philosophy. Thank you very much, Professor Redlin. By
the virtue of the authority delegated to me by the Regents of higher education of
the state of South Dakota I confer upon you the degree Doctor of Philosophy with
all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities pertaining thereto. Will
the candidates please proceed to the stage accompanied by their major
advisors? The candidates will be announced by Dr. Rebecca Britt, Assistant
Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication and hooded by Dean Doerner and their major advisors. Dr. Sidrat Abdullah, whose major area is
in plant science and Advisor Shaukat Ali and who is hooded by Dr. Emmanuel Byamuka. Dr. Rawnaq Chowdhury whose major area is in plant science and whose advisor is Dr. Febina Mathew Byamukama and who is hooded by Dr. Emmanuel Byamukama. Dr. Mohamed Aburweis whose major is in computational science and statistics and whose advisor is Xijin Ge. Dr. Patience Afedi whose major area is
in chemistry and whose advisor is Douglas Raynie. Dr. Sampson Asare whose major area is
chemistry and whose advisor is Douglas Raynie. Dr. Ganesh Degam whose major is in
chemistry and advisor is Douglas Raynie. Dr. Woubet Alemu whose major is
geospatial science and engineering and his advisor is Geoffrey Henebry. Dr. Abdullah Alhameid whose major is
plant science and advisor is Dr. Sandeep Kumar. Dr. Hadeel Waleed Alrayyes whose major is in biological sciences and advisor is Dr. Padmanaban Krishnan. Dr. Agatha Ampaire whose major is an
animal science and advisor is Dr. Crystal Levesque. Dr. Girma Birru whose major is plant
science and advisor is Douglas Melo. Dr. Daniel Boamah whose major is
biochemistry and advisor is Dr. Suvobrata Chakravarty. Dr. Stephanie Bruggeman whose major is
plant science and advisor is Dr. Sharon Clay. Dr. Mauricio Arizal Barradas whose major
is in plant science and advisor is Dr. Sharon Clay. Dr. Thomas Cox whose major is in
chemistry and advisor is Jihong Cole-Dai. Dr. Amanda Cross whose major is in
animal science and advisor is Dr. Joseph Cassady. Dr. Rakesh Dachineni whose major is pharmaceutical sciences and advisor is Dr. Jayarama Gunaje. Dr. Ashish Dubey whose major is
electrical engineering and advisor is Qiquan Qiao. Dr. Joseph Dzisam whose major is in
chemistry and advisor is Dr. Brian Logue. Dr. Nasir El Mesmari whose major is computational science and statistics and advisor is Gemechis Djira. Dr. Rajab Suliman whose major is computational science and statistics and advisor is Gemechis Djira. Dr. Amy Forbes whose major is in nursing
an advisor is Dr. Kay Foland. Dr. Julie Hansen whose major is in
nursing an advisor is Dr. Kay Foland. Dr. Dennis Gibson II whose major is in
chemistry an advisor is Dr. James Rice. Dr. Charles Halfmann whose major is in
biological sciences and advisor is Dr. Ruanbao Zhou. Dr. Michael Holbeck whose major is
sociology and advisor is Dr. Meredith Redlin. Dr. Lu Huang whose major is biochemistry and advisor is Dr. Adam Hoppe. Dr. Emily Huber whose major is nutrition exercise and food science and advisor is Jessica Meendering. Dr. Md Saiful Islam whose major area is pharmaceutical sciences and advisor is Dr. Perumal. Dr. Arash Jahandideh whose major area is agricultural bio systems and mechanical engineering and whose advisor is Dr. Muthu. Dr. Poonam Singha whose major area is
agricultural bio systems and mechanical engineering and whose major advisor is Dr. Muthu. Dr. Vijay Sundaram, whose major area is
agricultural bio systems and mechanical engineering Dr. Debbie Candell and whose major advisor is Dr. Muthu. Dr. Devi Candel whose major is plant sciences and whose advisor is Dr. Carla Clover. Dr. Govinda Karki whose major is in
biological sciences and advisor is Dr. Todd Trooien. Dr. Arturo Reyes-Gonzalez whose major
area is agricultural bio systems and mechanical engineering and major advisor is Dr. Todd Trooien. Dr. Laxman Karki whose major area is in computational science and statistics and advisor is Dr. Gary Hatfield. Dr. Alexander Kena whose major areas in
plant sciences and advisor is Xing-You Gu. Dr. Tulsi Kharel whose major areas in
plant sciences and advisor is Dr. David Clay Dr. Janna Kincheloe whose major area is in animal sciences and whose advisor is Dr. Kenneth Olson. Dr. Debra Laville-Wilson whose major is in sociology and advisor is Dr. Mary Emery. Dr. Douglas Simon whose major is in
sociology, advisor is Dr. Diane Kayongo-Male, and who is being hooded by Dr. Mary Emery. Dr. Whom Thiago whose major areas in
biological sciences and whose advisor is Dr. Feng Li. Dr. Chithra Sreenivasan whose major area is in biological sciences and whose advisors are Dr. Feng Li and Radhey Kaushik. Dr. Zhao Wang whose major is biological sciences and advisors are Dr. Feng Li and Dr. Radhey Kaushik. Dr. Milton Thomas whose majors
biological sciences and advisor is Dr. Radhey Kaushik. Dr. Mater Mahnashi whose major is in
chemistry and advisor is Dr. Fathi Halaweish. Dr. Maggie Minett whose major is in
biological sciences and advisor is Dr. Bonny Specker. Dr. Austin O’Brien whose major is computational science and statistics and advisor is Dr. Christopher Saunders. Dr. Danica Ommen whose major is computational science and statistics and advisor is Dr. Christopher Saunders. Dr. Oluwatobi Odeleye whose major area is in chemistry and advisor is Dr. Matthew Miller. Dr. Faten Okda whose major is in
biological sciences and advisor is Dr. Eric Nelson. Dr. Yaqoob Thurston whose major is in
plant sciences and advisor is Jose Gonzalez. Dr. Keliang Wang whose major is in biological sciences and whose advisor is Zhengroung Gu and who is hooded by C.Y. Wang. Thank you very much. We will now award
the Doctor of Nursing Practice degrees The Regents of Education of the State of South Dakota have authorized South Dakota State University to offer studies leading to professional degree of Doctor of Nursing Practice. Dean Nancy Fahrenwald of the College of Nursing will present the candidates for the degree. Will the candidates for the degree
Doctor of Nursing Practice please stand? President Dunn, these candidates were awarded their hood at a special ceremony last night. They are prepared as advanced
practice registered nurses to translate research in evidence into practice in
their roles in primary and specialty healthcare. By virtue of the authority delegated to me by the Regents of Education of the State of South Dakota, I confer upon each of you the degree Doctor of Nursing Practice with all the rights, privileges,
and responsibilities pertaining thereto. We will now award the Doctor of Pharmacy
degrees. The Regents of Education of the State of South Dakota have authorized
South Dakota State University to offer studies leading to the professional
degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. Interim Dean Jane Mort of the College of
Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions will present the candidates for the
degree. Will the candidates for the professional degree of Doctor of Pharmacy please stand? President Dunn, these students have completed six years of intensive, professional education and are well-prepared to use their knowledge and expertise to deliver pharmaceutical care for the benefit of their patients in the state and nations. These individuals were awarded their hoods at a special ceremony last night. at a special ceremony last night. I take
pleasure in presenting them in order that you may confer upon them the degree
of Doctor of Pharmacy. by virtue of the By virtue of the authority delegated to me by the Regents of Education of the State of South Dakota, I confer upon each of you the
degree Doctor of Pharmacy with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities
pertaining thereto. Will those who have earned this degree present themselves to the stage for recognition? Dr. Caitlin Aul. Dr. Brittany Bailey. Dr. Taylor Becker. Dr. Natalie Beiter. Dr. Elizabeth Berberich. Dr. Chelsea Berg. Dr. Danielle Bruscher. Dr. Alyssa Claussen. Dr. Daniel Cox. Dr. Stephanie Demers. Dr. Courtney Donnelli. Dr. Traci Eilers. Dr. Annessa Feder. Dr. Jace Finkbeiner. Dr. Kaylie Gabur. Dr. Tamara Giese. Dr. Margit Hansing. Dr. Stephanie Hanson. Dr. Levi Hattervig. Dr. Nicole Heeren. Dr. Jenna Heyen. Dr. Alyssa Hoff. Dr. Terra Hoffman. Dr. Breanne Hojer. Dr. Zachariah Iverson. Dr. Brianna Jansma. Dr. Levi Jensen. Dr. Zachary Jensen. Dr. Amanda Johnson Dr. Thomas Jorgensen. Dr. Mackenzie Klinkhammer. Dr. Luke Klugherz. Dr. Kaitlyn Kuske. Dr. Kerri Larson. Dr. Hannah Lau. Dr. Michael Meier. Dr. Courtney Neubert. Dr. Alex Ogren. Dr. Hannah Packer. Dr. Pooja Patel. Dr. Sachin Puri. Dr. Reed Reuman. Dr. Landi Risseeuw. Dr. Hannah Schmidt. Dr. Jason Schneider Dr. Grant Strain. Dr. Taylor Swanson. Dr. Lea Telkamp. Dr. Andrew Thies. Dr. Collin Townsend. Dr. Travis Ede. Dr. Brittanie Venard. Dr. Alexander Vos. Dr. Anthony Wacholz. Dr. Samantha Wagner Dr. Patrick Warman. Dr. Shannon Wegleitner. Dr. Jenna Welu. Dr. Abbey Wieczorek. Dr. Hailey Will. Dr. Zachary Williams. Dr. Crystal Wright. Dr. Kyle Yerks. Dr. Nicholas Young. We will now award master’s degrees. South
Dakota State University offers graduate study leading to the Masters of Arts, Masters of Education, Master of Mass Communication, Master of Architecture, Master of Public Health, Master of Engineering, and Master of Science degrees. Will the candidates for the master’s degrees please stand? By the virtue of the authority delegated
to me by the Regents of Higher Education of the State of South Dakota, I confer
upon each of you the appropriate master’s degrees with all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities pertaining thereto. The Dean of each College will present the candidates nominated for the master’s degrees. Interim Dean Daniel Scholl will introduce masters graduates from the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences. The rest of you may be seated. Will those who are candidates for these degrees please present themselves to the stage for recognition? President Dunn, upon satisfactory
completion of the graduate faculty requirements in the College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences for their respective degrees, these candidates will have demonstrated competency to service society in their chosen fields. Bennur Agbaba Taghreed Almalki Taylor Aubrey Nazia Azim Elise Berheim Brooke Brunsvig Ulas Cinar Bandana Dhungana Austin Erikson Olivia Durowah Hanxiao Feng Kaylee Faltys Krishna Ghimire Bailey Gullikson Shivali Jindal Deepak Joshi Dalia Khan Chance Kirkeeng Ann Kolthoff Zhadyra Kuldeyeva Claire LaCanne Hoanh Le Kali Linville Katherine Moratz Hunter Nedland Sudha Neupane Adhikari Sarah Nevison Taylor Olson Lee Opdahl Raymond Opoku Sunita Pathak Devendra Paudel Jacob Pecenka Susmita Poudel Bipin Rajpurohit Jessica Reiners Jerica Rich Alex Rosburg Emily Scholtz Shikha Singh Kopila Subedi Chalise Aaron Suehring Rifat Sultana Meghan Syrstad Chad Teslaa Ty Werdel Abdullah Alluhayb Faez Alotaibi Colin Tobin Yu Chen Dean Dennis Papini will introduce
graduates from the College of Arts and Sciences. Will those who are candidates for these degrees please present themselves to the stage for recognition? President Dunn, upon satisfactory
completion of the graduate faculty requirements in the College of Arts and
Sciences for their respective degrees, these candidates will have demonstrated
competency to serve society in their chosen fields. Andrea Barahona Marco Benassi Sam Cooper Joseph Donahoe Sarah Ellis Jodilyn Andrews Wei Gu Mika Hasanen Bryan Horwath Anthony Dyk Karissa Kuhle Erin Lionberger Andrea Malterud Ethan Millar Emily Nelsen Eric Odanga Jessica Peterson Ashley Phillips Beau Prest Annelieke Sinnema Heather Slunecka Spencer Sommers Morgan Swanson Caitlyn Voges Sigrid Wald Dean Jill Thorngren will introduce graduates from the College of Education and Human Sciences. Will those who are candidates for these degrees please present themselves to the stage for recognition? President Dunn, upon satisfactory
completion of the graduate faculty requirements in the College of Education
and Human Sciences for their respective degrees, these candidates will have demonstrated competency to serve society in their chosen fields. Chelsea Albus Alex Anderson Christina Ascheman Amanda Berckes Mercedes Bergman Marquette Bratsch Miranda Bren Jessica Brestel Karin Burdick Cody Burggraff Megan Bundy Megan Cottier Rebecca Cover Mallory Cox Alyssa Cronin Taylor DeVries John Diischer Phillip Dolan Alexandra Dossett Sarah Duff Danielle Duxbury Shayna Ebben Wendy Eich Ryan Engels William Ernst Jessica Foster Nicole Gruber Kirsten Gunderson Betsy Harwood Brian Hemenway Jordan Hilbert Emily Hofer Amber Houser Kari Johnson Kayla Johnson Sarah Lesnar Ramona Kauk Thomas Ksiazek Jacee McLellan Mary Mennella Kellie Nielsen Kristin Olson Nicole Peschong Zachary Reed Philip Reuer Alicia Reuman Kimberly Rowbootham Lindsey Sachs Daniel Schmidt Anne Sawyer Jordan Shorley Emily Smith Kelsi Stricherz Abbilene Sudtelgte Charles Tebben Kristina Thibeault Brittany Thompson Brianna Tilma Katelyn Tilstra Kal Triplett Gavin Van De Walle Cody Weingartz Emmalee Wright Dean Lou Brown will introduce the graduates from the Jerome J. Lohr College of Engineering. Will those who are candidates for these degrees please present themselves to the stage for recognition? President Dunn, upon satisfactory completion of the graduate faculty requirements in the Jerome J. Lohr College of Engineering for their respective degrees these candidates will have demonstrated competency to solve
some of our most challenging problems in science, technology, engineering and
mathematics. Muhammad Abdul-Rahim Razan Almualimi Ali Alsubeai Sami Alzahrani Abdullah Alzaydani John Asiruwa Madeline Ausdemore Shekhar Awasthi Kristin Baustian Saleh Bhuiyan Ryan Bouza Avijit Das Ruchi Dubey Cami Fuglsby Joseph Galvin Nazmul Hasan Calla Holzhauser Jiyeong Hong Ghaem Hooshyrai Ismail Kareem Muhammad Heshin Harshith Keni Ashim Dahal Manisha Maharjan Naresh Malla Xiaoli Mao Eden Simon Helicio Srikanth Matta Chelsea Menser Ashutosh Mishra Chul-Woo Pack Dhaval Patel Tamal Roy Dheeman Saha Elizabeth Schneider Bijaya Silwal Ayush Shakya Devansh Singh Prajina Tandukar Joshua Ward Most Farzana Yesmin Shaohu Zhang Zhou Peng Dean Nancy Fahrenwald will introduce
the graduates from the College of Nursing. Will the candidates for this degree please stand and present themselves to the stage? President Dunn, graduates of the College of Nursing Master of Science Program are prepared as family nurse practitioners, nurse educators, nurse administrators, and clinical nurse leaders. They were recognized at a special hooding ceremony last night and are not present with us today. Interim Dean Jane Mort will introduce the graduates from the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions. Will those who are candidates for the Master’s of Public Health please present themselves to the stage for recognition? President Dunn, these graduates have
completed the requirements to serve as public health administrators,
practitioners, researchers, and leaders who can address the public health needs
of America and beyond. Nichole Holroyd Deborah Rumrill And now we’ve come to the central moment in these ceremonies. Audience, please stand and join me in congratulating the new graduates. Thank you all for coming this afternoon.
It has been a pleasure and a privilege for me to preside at this 131st
commencement of celebration, my first as president of this distinguished
University. Graduates, you will now have earned your degree. You have realized your dream. Let your imagination guide you in the future and may your time as a Jackrabbit serve you well in the exciting future that awaits each of you. The 2017 Commencement Ceremony for South Dakota State University is now adjourned. Please rise as the colors are retired
and the platform party exits.

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